Album Review: Never Too Late by Dirty Cheetah - Kanan



In their debut full-length, Never Too Late, Montreal’s Dirty Cheetah puts forth effort in ten fast-paced tracks. With each one full of roaring instrumentation, and lustrous gang vocals, listeners will be provided with a soundtrack for a loud party. Providing little variation from song to song, listeners will not be able to find a track that fits the description of “tranquil”, that is, if that’s what they are looking for. This record is definitely for the old-school punk fans at heart.



Track 1, “Addicted”, is reminiscent of Hermosa Beach band, Pennywise (as are most tracks on this record), with tons of shouting and recognizable chords and lyrics. Fans who are eager to see this band may find such simplicity comforting, as it makes it easier to learn songs in that manner.



While Track 2 “Dr. Jerkoff”, has the same feel as the opening number, track 3 “Robot”, stands out a bit, but mainly due to the fact that there is an accompanying music video. After being rather fond of the drumming on Track 4, “Heartbreaker” (which semi-reminded me of the intro of Brody Dalle’s “Don’t Mess With Me”), I was regaled with more gang vocals, and lyrics recalling tales of heartbreak, or one heartbreaker in particular.


The next track “Got Caught” is again accompanied by a music video, bursting with previous onstage antics. “Got Caught” speaks of quite a simple formula - you break the rules, and therefore, you get caught. “Dioxide” and “After You” follow the same pattern as the previous tracks, but “Dioxide” seems to stand out with its anthemic guitar riffs and “After You” hints at someone or something being after them, but I suppose this is left to interpretation by the listener. “Psycho-Path” brings a little something different to the table, as I would say that this is the stand-out track amongst the lot.



“I Need It”, the final song on the album, repeats the lyrics “I need it, I need you outta my head!” Accompanied by whoa’s and the like, this track (as well as the previous ones) are left open to interpretation. Are we discussing a love interest of the past or present? Are we talking about a song? Who knows - and that’s a part of songwriting that really shows that a band has the capacity to play around with words.


Dirty Cheetah definitely has their own specified demographic, made for those who love to attend the show with their fists raised, ready to shout at the band during said performance. This band seems to be all about the fun, making angst-ridden songs perfect for fans of mid-90’s skate punk and earlier.